Importance of Protein

Why Do You We Need Protein?

The body needs protein to repair the muscles, which are worn out during a work-out or exercise. Drinking a protein shake after a workout is the quickest and most efficient way to heal and regenerate your muscles.

Also by increasing your protein intake you are promoting a healthier and leaner looking physique. Which in turn makes you feel fantastic!

In fact, hair and nails are mostly made of protein. Your body uses it to build and repair tissue. You need it to make enzymes, hormones, and other body chemicals. It is an important building block of bones, muscles, cartilage, skin, and blood.

Why should you care about making sure you get enough protein? Here are four good reasons:

  1. It is a component of every cell in your body.
  2. Your body uses it to build and repair tissue.
  3. You need it to make enzymes, hormones, and other body chemicals.
  4. It is an important building block of bones, muscles, cartilage, skin, and blood.

Like carbohydrates and fat, protein is a “macro-nutrient,” meaning that you need relatively large amounts of it to stay healthy. (Vitamins and minerals, which you only need in small quantities, are called “micro-nutrients.”)

Unlike carbohydrates and fat, your body does not store protein, so it has no reservoir to draw from when you’re running low. Protein bars and shakes are a great way to supplement your diet to ensure you’re getting the right amount of protein.

Benefits of a Protein-Enriched Diet

Consuming high-protein foods has many benefits, including:

  • Speeding recovery after exercise
  • Reducing muscle loss
  • Building lean muscle
  • Helping you maintain a healthy weight
  • Curbing hunger

Different Forms of Protein

Protein comes from a variety of sources, including meat, milk, fish, soy, and eggs, as well beans, legumes, and nut butters. When proteins are digested, they leave behind amino acids, which the human body needs to break down food.

Whey, a high quality protein source naturally found in milk, is a complete protein and contains all of the amino acids your body needs. In general, proteins derived from animal sources (i.e. milk, eggs & meat) are complete, but your body’s ability to use the protein varies.

HOW DOES GENES DIRECT THE PRODUCTION OF PROTEINS?

Most genes contain the information needed to make functional molecules called proteins. (A few genes produce other molecules that help the cell assemble proteins.) The journey from gene to protein is complex and tightly controlled within each cell.

It consists of two major steps: transcription and translation. Together, transcription and translation are known as gene expression.

During the process of transcription, the information stored in a gene’s DNA is transferred to a similar molecule called RNA (ribonucleic acid) in the cell nucleus. Both RNA and DNA are made up of a chain of nucleotide bases, but they have slightly different chemical properties.

The type of RNA that contains the information for making a protein is called messenger RNA (mRNA) because it carries the information, or message, from the DNA out of the nucleus into the cytoplasm.

Translation, the second step in getting from a gene to a protein, takes place in the cytoplasm. The mRNA interacts with a specialized complex called a ribosome, which “reads” the sequence of mRNA bases.

Each sequence of three bases, called a codon, usually codes for one particular amino acid. (Amino acids are the building blocks of proteins.) A type of RNA called transfer RNA (tRNA) assembles the protein, one amino acid at a time.

Protein assembly continues until the ribosome encounters a “stop” codon (a sequence of three bases that does not code for an amino acid).

The flow of information from DNA to RNA to proteins is one of the fundamental principles of molecular biology. It is so important that it is sometimes called the “central dogma.”

Through the processes of transcription and translation, information from genes is used to make proteins.

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